The automatic negative thoughts of social anxiety

A friend of mine shared a YouTube video on Facebook the other day. I cried the entire time I watched it. These are the thoughts I battle on a daily basis.

I’ve written about my anxiety before. I wrote about what it’s like to live with anxiety in a general sense. I wrote about how my social anxiety makes me feel guilty over ridiculous things. I wrote about how social media has helped me as much as if not more than Prozac. Each of those posts offered a small snapshot into what I go through with my anxieties. This video offers yet another.

Its poignancy is brilliant. If you deal with social anxiety, you should watch it . . . but you need to watch it until the very end. Even if you don’t deal with social anxiety, you should still watch the video. It provides an amazing understanding.

I recently told someone about my social anxiety disorder. She responded with, “What?!” and even 10 minutes later (as I talked her ear off) she said, “I’m sorry, but I can’t get past this social anxiety thing!”

I understand her reaction. It’s one I’ve received often. Being social and being comfortable in social situations are two entirely different things.

I once wrote, “I live my life between uncomfortable silence and uncomfortable noise.”

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6 responses to this post.

  1. Very powerful video–funny somewhere near the middle, after several “never” statements, I thought “Cognitive therapy will help get past the negativity” and the very next card was “This therapy isn’t working.” There are no easy answers, but I do agree with the conclusion. And your line “I live my life between uncomfortable silence and uncomfortable noise” is the most powerful of all.

    Reply

    • I’ve started watching some of her other YouTube videos and subscribed to her channel. I’ve only watched a little bit, but I’m really impressed so far.

      I wrote that line years ago. It was a holiday and I was at my aunt and uncle’s house. I sat in the living room alone and started writing. Now for the life of me, I can’t remember the rest of the piece! I’m going to have to start digging now!

      Reply

  2. Posted by Anita on July 16, 2011 at 12:48 am

    Unfortunately, I can relate. I used to sing. I sang in front of huge audiences. Then, one day, it all stopped. I could no longer walk out on a stage. I used to really write. I watched people, I asked them questions, and I gathered information. I started three completely different types of books. Then, one day, it all stopped. I used to be extremely socially active. Now, some people find it difficult to believe that I really am anti-social (which I say often). I am probably more anti-social social. But, it is true. One of the books that I’ve tried to write for years addresses some of the causes of this extreme change in my behavior. I do recognize the culprits, but that doesn’t make it any easier to ignore the automatic lies.

    Reply

    • “I do recognize the culprits, but that doesn’t make it any easier to ignore the automatic lies.”

      That’s exactly it! I made my boyfriend watch the video because he gets upset every time I ask him if he’s mad at me or if I did something wrong. The truth is that I feel that way about a lot of people most of the time, but I’m close enough to him to feel comfortable enough to ask!

      “Anti-social social” – I like that! I think I’m going to use it!

      Reply

  3. Posted by Anita on July 16, 2011 at 10:20 pm

    +1

    Reply

  4. […] is better than Prozac to explain . . . well, why social media is better than Prozac. And I wrote The automatic negative thoughts of social anxiety to share an amazing video from […]

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